Scattered stuff from a native New Yorker, disorganized former English Major, film buff, haiku enthusiast, semi-professional photographer and totally amateur fencer.

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the-lost-empires:

"I don’t know who wrote this review "For anyone obsessed with the Romanovs, this is the best book you’ll ever find", but oh my God! This book has beloved, sweet Maria having SEX with a soldier who plans to rescue her (typical, ridiculously inaccurate old story repeated numerous times), but I flipped when I read “Olga was defiled on the Rus”. OLGA, TATIANA NOR ANASTASIA WERE DEFILED ON THE RUS THIS IS A LIE THAT WAS PURPORTED BY THE BOLSHEVIK GUARDS. DISGUSTING! Also, in the opening chapter the author writes Russia was praying for seven years prior to Maria’ birth for an heir; Nicky and Alix wed in 1894, Maria born 1899 - this speaks volumes to the historical veracity.

I think perhaps what upsets me most—besides Olga being sexually assaulted—was that writers think—consciously or unconsciously-a woman’s life story is not worth telling if she didn’t fall in love, or have sex, or make out. "Marie" writes she’s happy she wont die a virgin.It just makes me sad that a beautiful amazing story like Maria’s is water-downed in not only a bland characterization, but as girl almost wholly concerned about love and sex, as if that is what makes her a real woman. (also, wouldn’t the real Maria have been smart enough to know having sex can result in pregnancy and endanger the lives of her family? Not that the real Maria would (she wouldn’t!), but besides the impossibility of privacy at Ipatiev and Maria’s prim Victorian upbringing, there’s no way can see her risking her family’s lives or possibility of a pregnancy just so she wont die a virgin)

The author mentions Helen Rappaport and Greg King as sources. In Rappaport’s new OTMA biography, she omitted the mention of this unfounded salacious rumour of Maria being caught in a “compromising position” with a guard, after Rappaport wrote of the baseless rumour (she uses the word *”alleged”*)in her Ekaterinburg book. As if Maria was worrying she was going to die a virgin.. Also, Greg King and Penny Wilson’s book “The Fate of the Romanovs” talks of the Bolshevik allegations OTMA was sexually assaulted, but they themselves have said on APTM that in their research they found it UNtrue.

Books like this, “Tsarina’s Daughter” and “Anastasia’s Secret” portray Maria, Tatiana and Anastasia, respectively, as bland characters unlike in personality to their historical basis, having unprotected and thoughtless sex like a 21st century uneducated girl. Sex doesn’t bother me in ANY way as long as it’s legal and safe, but portraying OTMA like this is so inaccurate - and having Olga sexually assaulted is INSULTING to her memory!

Save your cash on better Romanov books i.e. this one about Maria!!: The Lost Crown by Sarah Miller —a virtually if not completely accurate retelling of OTMA, with NO fictionalizations, lauded as a great novel by Kirkus, School Library Journal, and Booklist (the true voice of Maria is heard, the book is told alternately in each of Maria, Olga, Tatiana, and Anastasia’s voices! Miller vividly tells Maria’s unique tale of traveling across Siberia to Yekaterinburg).” (quote from a review) 

NOTE: this author also STOLE Ally Kumari/Alenka’s ( imperial-russia) artwork to promote her book without crediting Ally or asking permission

You know the reason I really think the Romanovs haven’t gotten a TV series/mini-series out of any cable channel when families like the Tudors, the Borgias, even Mary, Queen of Scots on the CW (!) have is because of the lack of sex. Nicholas and Alexandra were faithful to each other throughout their marriage and the five children were (very) devout Orthodox Christians raised in a strict Victoria upbringing. They died virgins. And I’m pretty sure they didn’t regret that.

In today’s media culture at least (after all there are still millions of devout Orthodox teenagers in Russian and elsewhere) both of these facts are tough to wrap one’s head around and so they pretend its not true or its true but in their version its not true.

Also -c’mon much of what we know about the family in Ekateriburg came straight from the boastful notes/memories of their murderers after the fact who butchered them in a way that we would not hesitate to call them mass murderers or terrorists today. So I take ANYTHING they say with a grain of salt. 

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romanov-princess:


"I’d like to know how anyone can write the truth about us if we’ve never met"
- Maria (‘The Lost Crown’ by Sarah Miller)

B O O K S 
The Lost Crown by Sarah Miller: By far the best book on OTMA, fictional or nonfictional. Starting in 1914, it alternates between each sisters’ voice from their privileged yet simple lives prior to the Russian Revolution. Next, we follow the sisters’ on a tragic but poignantly rewarding journey through their captivity at the Alexander Palace, then Tobolsk, and finally Yekaterinburg; a journey of sisterhood, friendship, family, and dreams. The sisters’ personalities are brilliantly reconstructed by Miller in this fictional retelling, which is unprecedentedly accurate in historical fiction. Romanov fiction has always portrayed OTMA very inaccurately in personality and in events. But this novel is out of this world in its virtual if not complete historical accuracy.
The Diary of Olga Romanov: Royal Witness to the Russian Revolution by Helen Azar*: An unprecedented historical account of one of the tsar’s daughters: Olga. This work is a beautiful biography of the eldest princess, including strong detailing of Russia prior to WWI and Olga’s childhood, followed by Olga’s 1914-1918 diaries and letters (and other firsthand accounts related to her, including of her family and fellow nurses)
Anastasia’s Album by Hugh Brewster: A scrapbook-style biography of Anastasia and her sisters, this book “uses Anastasia’s own photos, watercolors, letters, and diaries, long hidden in Russian archives, to reveal an engaging portrait of Russia’s last princess, her family, and their difficult exile in Siberia after the Russian revolution.”
Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess by Carolyn Meyer:The first real attempt to give voice to one of the princesses comes in the form of this very moving, fictionalized diary of Anastasia (the real Anastasia burned all her diaries). This virtually accurate novel recounts Anastasia’s life from 1914, the author giving this princess her true voice for the first time in fiction. 
Nicholas and Alexandra by Robert Massie: This is arguably the definitive work on the last Romanov family as whole - Nicholas, Alexandra, Olga, Tatiana, Maria, Anastasia, and Alexei.
Russia’s Last Romanovs: In Their Own Words by Helen Azar and contributed by Eva & Dan McDonald: The same talented Russianist who brought us Olga’s diaries now brings us a treasure trove of firsthand accounts—much previously unpublished or translated—of OTMA, their parents, and brother, including their diaries (more of Olga’s as well as others!) and letters, as well as memoirs from those closest to them offering hilarious yet heart breaking anecdotes of the sisters. Some of the many unique features of this book include the entire list of OTMA’s books in captivity! 
The Family Romanov by Candace Fleming: A new, critically acclaimed biography of the last Romanov family, including large sections dedicated solely to the sisters. 
The Romanovs : Love, Power & Tragedy by A. N. Bokhanov, et al: an unmatched photo-biography of the last Romanovs, including many photos, diaries/letters, details, and anecdotes of OTMA and their family you won’t find in most Romanov books. 
The Road to Ekaterinburg by ECS Banks: Not a biography, but rather a very informational and antectodal history of OTMA’s day-to-day lives from 1913 through their last days together. Much of the information has been previously unpublished. 
W E B S I T E S
Wikipedia: This is the OTMA page, with links to each grand duchess. Wikipedia is a great intro to the sisters, as it was for well me!
Livadia.org: An OTMA tribute site with individual scrapbook-style profiles of each of the grand duchesses. Livadia also has a biographical page on the sisters as a whole and individually.
Olga Nikolaevna: A work-in-progress dedication to Olga. Check back soon! 
Tatiana Romanova: A site dedicated to Tatiana, including a detailed biography and her letters/diaries/quotes, short profiles of her family, “tours” of her homes and belongings. 
The Diary of Olga Romanov: Helen Azar’s very active and friendly public page on facebook. 
Four Dancing Princesses: A fansite dedicated to OTMA, including detailed biographies, quotes, photos etc. 
OTMA: Lost Hope: Very similar to above, but with its own style. 
Alexander Palace Time Machine: The “preeminent” Romanov website, it is full of info, photos, accounts, biographies, and free versions of memoirs from Gilliard, Anya, Buxhoeveden, Felix, Lili, etc.But the best information is on the message boards.
Frozen-Tears: a media-rich online library of Romanov movies, home videos, music, photos, articles, documentaries, fan art, etc.
Tsarevich Alexei: a youtube user has uploaded virtually all Romanov documentaries. 
Ipatiev House: A virtual tour of infamous Ekaterinburg mansion. 
F I L M S  &  D O C S 
Romanovs: An Imperial Family: This film recounts the final year and a half of the lives of the last Romanovs, starting a little before the Revolution. Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia are stars right alongside their parents and brother. The actresses look and act scarily like the real sisters. By far the best portrayal. 
Last of the Czars: Three-part documentary of Nicholas, Alexandra, Olga, Tatiana, Maria, Anastasia and Alexei as a whole. Includes many interesting anecdotes and tons of footage of OTMA. 
Russia’s Last Tsar: An hour long documentary of the last Romanov family, including footage, photos, and anecdotes.
*Azar is currently translating Tatiana’s daries and hopes to do individual books of Maria and Anastasia. 

romanov-princess:

"I’d like to know how anyone can write the truth about us if we’ve never met"

- Maria (‘The Lost Crown’ by Sarah Miller)

B O O K S 

  • The Lost Crown by Sarah MillerBy far the best book on OTMA, fictional or nonfictional. Starting in 1914, it alternates between each sisters’ voice from their privileged yet simple lives prior to the Russian Revolution. Next, we follow the sisters’ on a tragic but poignantly rewarding journey through their captivity at the Alexander Palace, then Tobolsk, and finally Yekaterinburg; a journey of sisterhood, friendship, family, and dreams. The sisters’ personalities are brilliantly reconstructed by Miller in this fictional retelling, which is unprecedentedly accurate in historical fiction. Romanov fiction has always portrayed OTMA very inaccurately in personality and in events. But this novel is out of this world in its virtual if not complete historical accuracy.
  • The Diary of Olga Romanov: Royal Witness to the Russian Revolution by Helen Azar*: An unprecedented historical account of one of the tsar’s daughters: Olga. This work is a beautiful biography of the eldest princess, including strong detailing of Russia prior to WWI and Olga’s childhood, followed by Olga’s 1914-1918 diaries and letters (and other firsthand accounts related to her, including of her family and fellow nurses)
  • Anastasia’s Album by Hugh Brewster: A scrapbook-style biography of Anastasia and her sisters, this book “uses Anastasia’s own photos, watercolors, letters, and diaries, long hidden in Russian archives, to reveal an engaging portrait of Russia’s last princess, her family, and their difficult exile in Siberia after the Russian revolution.”
  • Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess by Carolyn Meyer:The first real attempt to give voice to one of the princesses comes in the form of this very moving, fictionalized diary of Anastasia (the real Anastasia burned all her diaries). This virtually accurate novel recounts Anastasia’s life from 1914, the author giving this princess her true voice for the first time in fiction. 
  • Nicholas and Alexandra by Robert Massie: This is arguably the definitive work on the last Romanov family as whole - Nicholas, Alexandra, Olga, Tatiana, Maria, Anastasia, and Alexei.
  • Russia’s Last Romanovs: In Their Own Words by Helen Azar and contributed by Eva & Dan McDonald: The same talented Russianist who brought us Olga’s diaries now brings us a treasure trove of firsthand accounts—much previously unpublished or translated—of OTMA, their parents, and brother, including their diaries (more of Olga’s as well as others!) and letters, as well as memoirs from those closest to them offering hilarious yet heart breaking anecdotes of the sisters. Some of the many unique features of this book include the entire list of OTMA’s books in captivity! 
  • The Family Romanov by Candace Fleming: A new, critically acclaimed biography of the last Romanov family, including large sections dedicated solely to the sisters. 
  • The Romanovs : Love, Power & Tragedy by A. N. Bokhanov, et al: an unmatched photo-biography of the last Romanovs, including many photos, diaries/letters, details, and anecdotes of OTMA and their family you won’t find in most Romanov books. 
  • The Road to Ekaterinburg by ECS Banks: Not a biography, but rather a very informational and antectodal history of OTMA’s day-to-day lives from 1913 through their last days together. Much of the information has been previously unpublished. 

W E B S I T E S

  • WikipediaThis is the OTMA page, with links to each grand duchess. Wikipedia is a great intro to the sisters, as it was for well me!
  • Livadia.org: An OTMA tribute site with individual scrapbook-style profiles of each of the grand duchesses. Livadia also has a biographical page on the sisters as a whole and individually.
  • Olga Nikolaevna: A work-in-progress dedication to Olga. Check back soon! 
  • Tatiana RomanovaA site dedicated to Tatiana, including a detailed biography and her letters/diaries/quotes, short profiles of her family, “tours” of her homes and belongings. 
  • The Diary of Olga Romanov: Helen Azar’s very active and friendly public page on facebook. 
  • Four Dancing Princesses: A fansite dedicated to OTMA, including detailed biographies, quotes, photos etc. 
  • OTMA: Lost Hope: Very similar to above, but with its own style. 
  • Alexander Palace Time Machine: The “preeminent” Romanov website, it is full of info, photos, accounts, biographies, and free versions of memoirs from Gilliard, Anya, Buxhoeveden, Felix, Lili, etc.But the best information is on the message boards.
  • Frozen-Tears: a media-rich online library of Romanov movies, home videos, music, photos, articles, documentaries, fan art, etc.
  • Tsarevich Alexeia youtube user has uploaded virtually all Romanov documentaries. 
  • Ipatiev House: A virtual tour of infamous Ekaterinburg mansion. 

F I L M S  &  D O C S 

  • Romanovs: An Imperial Family: This film recounts the final year and a half of the lives of the last Romanovs, starting a little before the Revolution. Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia are stars right alongside their parents and brother. The actresses look and act scarily like the real sisters. By far the best portrayal. 
  • Last of the CzarsThree-part documentary of Nicholas, Alexandra, Olga, Tatiana, Maria, Anastasia and Alexei as a whole. Includes many interesting anecdotes and tons of footage of OTMA. 
  • Russia’s Last Tsar: An hour long documentary of the last Romanov family, including footage, photos, and anecdotes.

*Azar is currently translating Tatiana’s daries and hopes to do individual books of Maria and Anastasia. 

(Source: the-lost-empires)

• Text Post

July 17th, 1918: The Execution of the Romanovs

pavigetslaid:

"The decision was not only expedient but necessary. The severity of the summary justice showed the world that we would continue to fight on mercilessly, stopping at nothing. The execution of the Tsar’s family was needed not only in order to frighten, horrify, and dishearten the enemy, but also in order to shake up our own ranks to show that there was no going back." - Leon Trotsky (1879 - 1940)

"With the saints give rest, O Christ, to the soul of your servant where there is neither pain, nor sorrow, nor suffering but life everlasting."
- A Russian Orthodox prayer for the dead, contained within the last Church service the Romanovs ever attended on Sunday July 14th 1918. The officiating priest, Father Storozhev, reported that the Tsar’s daughters had tears in their eyes as they said the prayer.

Those slaughtered on that terrible night were Nicholas II, the former Emperor of All the Russias, his German-born but British-educated Empress Alexandra, their four daughters, 23 year-old Grand Duchess Olga, 21 year-old Grand Duchess Tatiana, 19 year-old Grand Duchess Maria, 17 year-old Grand Duchess Anastasia, and the Emperor’s 13 year-old son, Alexei, who had things gone differently, might one day have reigned as Tsar Alexei II. Also killed on that night was the Imperial Family’s faithful physician, Dr. Botkin, the Tsar’s valet, Alexei Trupp, their cook, Ivan Kharitanov, and Anna Demidova, the Grand Duchesses’ maid. 

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I love to use that quote to those who think Trotsky was the “good” Communist as opposed to Stalin. Those who think “summary justice” included shooting a hemophiliac 13 years old three times in the skull while he is already crawling on the floor in a pool of his own blood or bayoneting his teenage sisters over and over again have something seriously wrong with them. 

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romanovqueen:

Favorite OTMA anecdotes {2/10}
Aʟᴇxᴀɴᴅʀᴀ was now anxious about Marie Nicolaievna only. The latter had been taken ill much later than her sisters, and her condition was aggravated by a severe attack of pneumonia and of a virulent kind. Her constitution was excellent, but she had all she could do to survive. She was a victim of her own devotion. This girl of seventeen had spent herself without reflection during the revolution. She had been her mother’s greatest comfort and stand-by. During the night of March 13th she had been rash enough to go out with her mother to speak to the soldiers, thus exposing herself to the cold, even though she realised that her illness was beginning. 

- Tʜɪʀᴛᴇᴇɴ ʏᴇᴀʀs ᴀᴛ ᴛʜᴇ Rᴜssɪᴀɴ ᴄᴏᴜʀᴛ, Pɪᴇʀʀᴇ Gɪʟʟɪᴀʀᴅ

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